Mixed Seed

These particular seeds are from a ten year old batch of mixed salad seeds that I purchased over the internet. I have had these guys with me for a long time. Mostly because they were such a pain to work with the first time I tried. But, now with my new stainless steel mesh sprouting jars they are much easier.

From the taste I have identified clover and radish. I have no clue what the rest of the seeds are. Sort of like Mixed Floral honey. Meaning, we have no clue but we pretty much figure the honey comes from flowers.

Mixed Seeds

Mixed Seeds

The above image clearly demonstrates at least four different types of seeds. If you happen to recognize the seed perhaps you can mention in the comments below.

Mixed seeds set to soak

Mixed seeds set to soak

Seeds in the jar, set to soak over night. Is over night the proper amount of time for these to soak? I have no clue. I am deliberately seeing what happens if I use pretty much the same simplistic formula. Soak over night, drain, rinse several times during the day, harvest when they are big enough to look yummilicous.

Mixed seeds after soaking overnight

Mixed seeds after soaking overnight

After one night of soaking the show a hint of perhaps a sprout poking its head out. But only a hint.

Mixed seeds (36 hours)

Mixed seeds (36 hours)

After 36 hours the volume of the seeds is almost doubled.  And we have more than hints that sprouting is happening. Yay! My ten year old seeds are still viable.

Mixed seeds (36 hours) Close-up

Mixed seeds (36 hours) Close-up

This close-up is even more encouraging. Look at all those little sprouts poking out. However, you will notice that not all the seeds have put forth a sprout as yet. This illustrates why I didn’t continue working with mixed seeds. They just don’t sprout at the same time. I prefer working with individual seeds so that I can control the harvest so that each seed is at its best. In a mixed seed situation some seeds are a little young (under sprouted) or some are a little old (over sprouted).

Mixed seeds (48 hours) Close-up

Mixed seeds (48 hours) Close-up

Here we have a close-up at 48 yours. Some seeds are well along, and others are finally getting down to the business of sprouting.

Mixed seeds (72 hours)

Mixed seeds (72 hours)

Here we have 72 hours. The sprouts are a little over half the jar now. I tasted them at this stage and they are quite nice, but a few are definitely under-done.

Mixed seeds (72 hours) Close-up

Mixed seeds (72 hours) Close-up

The sprouts look excellent in this close-up.

Mixed seeds (96 hours)

Mixed seeds (96 hours)

At 96 hours (4 days) the mixed seed sprouts are ready to harvest. The jar is packed tight. I really should have started with a few less seeds in the beginning. It is so easy to over estimate how many seeds for the jar in the beginning.

Mixed seeds (96 hours) Hulls

Mixed seeds (96 hours) Hulls

The hulls and seed shells float nicely on the water. Easy to remove with a little agitation and skimming.

Mixed seeds (96 hours) Close-up

Mixed seeds (96 hours) Close-up

This is a close-up of the sprouts ready for eating. We have leavings, stems, and roots — along with a few hulls and seed coats. With more work, I could have removed pretty much all the hulls. But, I don’t mind the extra roughage. I suppose if someone comes along and informs me of a nutritional draw back to eating the hulls I will be more careful. But for the moment I like the texture. YMMV

Mixed seeds bagged (96 hours)

Mixed seeds bagged (96 hours)

And above we have the soon to be refrigerated and munched upon sprouts. All in all I love sprouting seeds, but mixed seeds is not my bag (sorry no pun intended). I prefer working with seeds individually so that I can control how far along they are before harvest. I don’t like being forced to harvest one seed too soon to prevent another from getting to far along.